In this new, highly anticipated update of her pioneering Killing Us Softly series, the first in more than a decade, Jean Kilbourne takes a fresh look at how advertising traffics in distorted and destructive ideals of femininity. The film marshals a range of new print and television advertisements to lay bare a stunning pattern of damaging gender stereotypes -- images and messages that too often reinforce unrealistic, and unhealthy, perceptions of beauty, perfection, and sexuality. By bringing Kilbourne's groundbreaking analysis up to date, Killing Us Softly 4 stands to challenge a new generation of students to take advertising seriously, and to think critically about popular culture and its relationship to sexism, eating disorders, and gender violence.

Jean Kilbourne: Jean Kilbourne, Ed.D. is internationally recognized for her groundbreaking work on the image of women in advertising and for her critical studies of alcohol and tobacco advertising. In the late 1960s she began her exploration of the connection between advertising and several public health issues, including violence against women, eating disorders, and addiction, and launched a movement to promote media literacy as a way to prevent these problems. A radical and original idea at the time, this approach is now mainstream and an integral part of most prevention programs. Her films, lectures and television appearances have been seen by millions of people throughout the world. Kilbourne was named by The New York Times Magazine as one of the three most popular speakers on college campuses. She is the creator of the renowned Killing Us Softly: Advertising's Image of Women film series and the author of the award-winning book Can't Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel and co-author of So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids.

Comments (28)

Laura avatar
Laura

shes only a hypocrite who mocks the very things she says she hates... She laughs at men and glorifies sex with elephants- while the audience she gets a kick from laughs like HAHAHA! BLABLABLA- she sux!

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Anonymous

I loved it, it brought me to tears in a happy way.

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Lk

"Caucasian features." Humanity started out in East Africa. East Africans have always had what is now referred to as "Caucasian features."

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Anonymous

Truth!

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Anonymous

really opened my eyes to media and it's affect on woment

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Anonymous

Excellent and I wanted more critics of mass culture and what we can do to combat this.

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Anonymous

An ever more important subject as university campuses, presumably the most enlightened of spaces in society, themselves become the stages for misogyny and patriarchy to play out.

Donald avatar
Donald

A very insightful lecture indeed.

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Dee

I liked the honesty, and the exposure of how audiences are duped by advertisers.

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Melinda Sue

Here is my full reply to a Final exam question for my History class.

Images of women in advertising has changed over the years. According to Jean Kilbourne from her movie Killing Us Softly 4, "The average American is exposed to over 3000 ads every single day, and will spend 2 years of ...Read more

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Anonymous

wonderful. this video is a great way to get society to see where we are going wrong. even if most don't see it as an issue it is a big issue and I think the men and women that view this particular video will look at a few ads differently from here on out

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Anonymous

So enlightening. I totally agree with what is being said.

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Anonymous

This really opened up my eyes to media and advertising in a way I never would have imagined.
Great speech/movie!

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Anonymous

Profoundly enlightening; she present her well-planned research with command and authority,--and the appropriate tidbits of humor here-and-there, without detracting from the seriousness of the subject matter--, a must-see, to be sure, for anyone who is concerned with the both social and human ...Read more

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Salem

Pertinent, valuable for classroom discussion and very well researched.

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Sarah

Wonderful message on the topic.

Overall, "We're citizens, not consumers," and we deserve the ability to have "authentic and freely chosen lives."

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Anonymous

Amazing video. Definitely a must see for everyone! Something, many things, need to dramatically change for a better future for everyone.

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Chad Charlie

She touches this topic in various perspectives. Very great lecture and presentation.

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Anonymous

I like the way she is confronting the media.

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Krista

this movie is very real, it bypasses ideals and brings hard truth to the forefront of thought and thinking. it doesn't only focus on one type of the demorilizing behaviors of todays culture but most typs.

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Alyson Matusek

I agree with her. Why cant we all be considered the same? Very well stated. Enjoyed!

Jean avatar
Jean

I started collecting ads in the late 1960s- tearing them out of magazines and putting them on my refrigerator. Eventually I had a collage of ads and I started to see a pattern, a kind of statement about what it meant to be a woman in this culture. I focus on advertising because I've always ...Read more

Tom avatar
Tom

Without doubt one of the leading films on gender bias and gender-related issues in the media today. It would be fascinating to see some further research into the connection between the way women are portrayed in the media and the impacts on other social issues such as gender inequality in the ...Read more

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#GamerGate

What a diatribe of fanatical 3rd wave feminism. The premise is completely destroyed when Kilbourne tries to minimize her same points in regard to males.

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Anonymous

I feel you missed the point of what she was trying to say. I didn't see it as minimizing, she was trying to explain what made it different. It would be like saying that showing a woman being the abuser in the ad had exactly the same cultural implications as and ad showing a man being the ...Read more

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Cassi

Basically a classic in understanding how advertising effects all of us and breaking through the barriers of the unrealistic way advertising expresses femininity

Jean avatar
Jean

I started collecting ads in the late 1960s- tearing them out of magazines and putting them on my refrigerator. Eventually I had a collage of ads and I started to see a pattern, a kind of statement about what it meant to be a woman in this culture. I focus on advertising because I've always ...Read more

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Anonymous

This was powerful and insightful for me. Thank you for sharing your collected knowledge and ads.